Newlands hall wedding venue

Newlands hall wedding venue

Newlands Hall wedding venue

Now here is another cracking little wedding venue. Newlands Hall wedding venue. Situated just outside of Chelmsford Essex. 15th Century manor house. Full of character. Newlands hall is one of those little gems of a wedding venue slightly off the beaten track. The original manor of ‘Newlanda’ or newly won land and listed in the Domesday book 0f 1086. legend even has it that the Tudor estate of Newland hall was a lodge for Henry the eighth. An excellent wedding venue with its sweeping drive leading down to the venue. Hidden from the main road. The House decorated with a light and airy Georgian feel,  manicured lawns, the Grand marquee for the wedding breakfast and also for when it rains and even a moat. For the discerning Groom with priorities in hand, there are even the attached carp fishing lakes to relax and enjoy after (or even before) a hectic day of getting married. Newlands Hall doesn’t feel like a managed business more like someone’s family home with all the rustic charm of a typical country house. Lots of little nooks and crannies for those exclusive shots of the couple for the wedding album, the lawn with the Hall as a backdrop feature and the Barn for that romantic shot of the day.

The wedding of Paul & Jackie in July of 2016. As with any British wedding, the day is dependant on the weather. We all know how unpredictable the weather can be in this country. One day pouring with rain and the next beautiful warm sunshine. Well, what a  lovely summers day for a beautiful wedding was this turning out to be. From my point of view as the photographer of the day, not so much, we hate the harsh midday bright sunshine. Why I hear you ask. Shadows, lots of ugly shadows. In an ideal world, a wedding would have some cloud but still be bright enough to use the natural light and a touch of flash to give some shadow to the face which is all controlled by me. Place the subject under trees but then we get shadows off the leaves and all over their faces, Which doesn’t  look very good. Out in the open with their backs to the sun, Better no shadows,  But flash and lots of it has to be used firing directly at the wedding party so no silhouette is formed by the backlit sunshine.  Preferably lots of off camera flash. Get the balance of the flash and the backlit sunlight right and you have a very pleasing image. Luckily a very relaxed wedding. With the heat of the day keeping everything subdued, more time to concentrate on getting decent images and using the bright sunlight to my advantage. Although there are lots of disadvantages to filming in bright sunlight one of the advantages for me is my spikey sun shots which I love doing. The couple in a nice relaxed natural embrace. Full power bare flash on a stand with remote triggers and my fav lens, sigma 15mm fisheye. Get down low and shot done. Not every photographer’s cup of tea, but I love it.

All in all a very nice wedding and a highly recommended wedding venue for those couples who want intimacy from a smaller but more inclusive venue for their wedding day.

Newlands hall wedding venue

Wedding photography backup

Wedding photography backup

As a photographer i may be shooting three or four weddings per week. That can equate to thousands of images. Lately wedding clients have been asking me how do i protect all their precious images from getting lost or deleted accidentally. Well here goes. At an average wedding i may shoot 700 to 1000 images all recorded in RAW file format That is an awful lot of memory space.
Shooting with a Nikon D4 i have the option to record onto a dual card slot system, one a Cf card and the other onto XQD format, one backing up after the other or i could record one in RAW and the other in JPEG but for peace of mind, main and backup. So at least if the Cf card fails i have the same images on the XQD card. In the last three years of using the D4 i have only had  one instance of a partial card failure, that CF card stopped recording after 115 images, luckily the XQD card saved the day and the guilty CF card was instantly resigned to the bin. Once the wedding is over and im back in the office, i will upload the card to lightroom, convert to Digital negatives and then from there export as a catalogue to three external hard drives tagged as “backup” and then to another three external hard drives and tagged as “edit file”. With one main drive from which i work from for the editing. Create a desktop folder with the clients first names and date of the wedding and edit all the completed jpegs into that folder. Now lots of other photographers have there own ideas on how they back up and tag their images, ie, by date or times etc, my workflow system works for me and i can edit a complete wedding of average 800 images onto a folder of approx 350 to 400 images within a few hours. From there the completed JPEGS folder is again backed up onto two separate hard drives solely for the storage of JPEG files. Once all the backups are completed onto their multiple redundancy drives then and only then will i reformat the CF and XQD cards. From there i will export the complete JPEG folder to my online gallery system.